The Traditional Japanese House and Architecture

 The houses are traditionally timber house plans. Some of oldest houses dated from the 16th Century. These houses are now in museums which is an object of study by craftsman and builders.

The plan of the house and how it is used also remain traditional. Only the kitchen and sometimes the place for eating meals are modern; the other rooms, for working, sleeping and social intercourse, remain true to tradition. The floor is covered with straw mats (tatami); the family kneels at low tables to eat and drink, and they sleep on the floor as from time immemorial. <4>

Thus living in the Japanese style broadly implies adherence to tradition, just as we would do if we dwelt in modified chalets in our central European cities. The architect, as a ‘creative’ designer, has no part to play in the traditional housing of Japan. The craftsman designs the house according to ancient traditional rules, as was the case for centuries in our mountain valleys.

The Design of The Traditional Japanese House
The Traditional Japanese House has view into the garden, the house is flexible , the strength  of the house and the beauty of the house is amazingly well built all together that creates a wonderful and comfortable ambiance as one enters into the The Traditional Japanese House. The comfortable feeling is what Architects try to create, a feeling that put you to ease as you are inside the home.

 a)Views into the garden

The houses are design for views in to the garden, balconies are surrounded with cuts the sun and the harsh weather in the homes. Balconies are essentially a major feature of the Japanese House.

b) Flexibility

The partition made of light material to allow flexibility of the use of room. A living room could be the dining, or even a common family area. Sliding Shoji Screens are common.

 c)Strength of structured

The structure of the timber that is used of extra strength to endure the weathering and the earthquakes that Japan is so frequently subjected too. While the structure is robust the internal materials are light weight using paper, bamboo, straw and timber.

d)Beauty

The elegance and grace of the house is aesthetically designed to bring a simplistic view of the house with little furniture which helps the mind to likewise be simple and functional in thinking and living.This helps to think straight and live straight disciplining the mind and the body.

The Japanese House Plans
As you enter into the house, the shoes are removed at the Genkan( Hall way) and slippers are worn .

 Architectural Insights
Economy and brief of material used is maintained and the use of light passing into spaces via translucent material is common.

The perfect proportions of squares are used relating to the tatami mats.

Haiku timber House
Haiku is a type of poetry, which means each poem contains seventeen syllables–frequently in the order of 5, 7, 5 syllables .The theme of haiku poetry is the relationship and interaction between nature and humankind.Haiku says that form and function are one. This philosophy was adopted by Frank Lloyd Wright. Haiku Houses have many of the features of their Bungalows.It is elegant and beautiful, priceless in its inherent peace, tranquility and harmony.

The Traditional Japanese House were in many way designed for Net Zero Energy Building, firstly  the house were made of timber which was a naturally abundant and the veranda  were thermal zones which kept the heat away during the summers the smart landscaping  kept the heat  away during summer and the homes were lifted above the ground to keep the heat away from the ground which air below the floor was a good form of insulation, the interiors were made of paper which was an excellent material which insulated the interiors form gaining heat nor losing heat during winters, with respect to Green sustainability the choice of timber could never get better.

Before leaving the site, please check out for our boutique designs for Japanese floor plans at : http://www.sda-architect.com/

And enjoy.

Thank you

Prepared by Net Zero Energy Building Architect Perumal Nagapushnam: http://www.sda-architect.com/

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